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Welcome! theretrosite.com is an online community focused on sharing and reminiscing about pop-culture video, audio, and images that stir our memories of the past - old television, theme songs, commercials, print advertisements, and more. We've got the sights and sounds you remember from the 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s and beyond... Come join our friendly community and start sharing your memories! If you are a Baby Boomer or Gen Xer, you will find this to be the site for memories! This site is rated G (maybe PG on some posts) you can always feel comfortable sharing this site to your mother, kids or grandkids!

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1970's


  • Gunilla Hutton-Nat King Cole Romance

    Gunilla Hutton was the Swedish singer/dancer who was the second actress to play eldest sister Billie Jo Bradley on Petticoat Junction. She was also a regular on Hee Haw for many years; her character was appropriately named Nurse Goodbody. Less well known is Hutton's involvement with Nat King Cole. At age 20, she began a romantic tryst with the legendary singer, who was 47, while she toured with his show. Had the public learned about it at the time (1964), the interracial affair and their age difference would have been a major scandal. Still, Cole was prepared to divorce Maria, his wife of 21 years, but ill health entered the equation. Cole was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer. Knowing he had only a short time to live, Cole opted to stay with his wife instead of Hutton.

     

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  • James Scott - Prisoner Boxer

    One of the most controversial professional athletes in history was James Scott--a light heavyweight boxer who was permitted to pursue a professional ring career from within the confines of a New Jersey state prison. By the time Scott was 28 years old he had spent about half his life in reformatories or prisons. After serving time in Rahway State Prison for robbery, Scott began boxing professionally in Miami under the tutelage of Angelo and Chris Dundee in the mid-1970s. He compiled a record of 11-0-1 before trouble found him again. A car he owned was linked to a robbery and murder. Scott maintained he had merely loaned the car to friends and was utterly unaware of their plans. Law enforcement didn't buy his story and Scott was returned to Rahway prison to serve a 30-year term for parole violation. While there Scott persuaded correctional officials that a prison boxing program would benefit everyone: Prisoners would be able to release their frustrations in an acceptable manner, they could pursue professional careers upon their releases, and the overall camaraderie among all prisoners would be improved. The state thought Scott's idea had merit. Remarkably, they also allowed Scott to resume his pro boxing career--as long as his opponents were willing to fight inside the prison. Scott--whose fitness regimen reputedly included 1,500 push-ups per day--became a force to be reckoned with. He earned a top-10 ranking from the World Boxing Association in an era when the light heavyweight division was very deep. NBC and CBS each aired Scott's bouts. ABC, however, kept its distance from Scott due to his criminal convictions. Scott's biggest win came over Eddie Gregory in 1977. Gregory was the number-one-ranked contender at the time and would eventually win the WBA championship. Whenever a Scott bout was shown on TV there were numerous complaints forwarded to the network from people who did not think an incarcerated person should be allowed to pursue a pro sports career in prison. The rival World Boxing Council agreed and never did rank Scott. Eventually the WBA dropped Scott from its rankings too, largely because he would most likely have to leave Rahway to fight for a championship. With no hope of ever fighting for a title, Scott's career waned. Scott lost two of his last three fights to end his career with a record of 19-2-1. Scott's final bout, a 1981 defeat, came at the hands of Dwight Braxton who would later win world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. Ironically, Braxton had been a former Rahway inmate himself. Scott was finally released from prison in 2005 when he was in his mid-sixties.

     

    This was originally posted to YouRememberThat.com by member Lava 1965 on July, 2015

     

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  • Ricky Segall - Killer of The Partridge Family

    One certain indicator that a TV show is slipping is the pointless addition of a new character. It is especially true when a child is added to a show's cast in a desperate attempt to attract more youthful viewers. Along those lines, who remembers little Ricky Segall on The Partridge Family? For many die-hard fans of the show, Segall is the Partridges' equivalent of "Cousin Oliver"--Robbie Rist's character who is often unfairly blamed for killing The Brady Bunch. The Partridge Family was a top-20 show in both 1971-72 and 1972-73. For reasons best known to ABC, for the 1973-74 season it was moved from its secure Friday night time slot to Saturdays at 8 p.m. where it hopelessly had to compete against All In The Family on CBS. Furthermore, someone at ABC thought the Partridge kids were getting up in years--after all Suzanne Crough (who played youngest child Tracy) was an old lady of ten in 1973--and thus alienating younger viewers. Enter four-year-old singer Ricky Segall who played neighbor Ricky Stevens. Sporting a Prince Valiant haircut, Stevens' shtick was to act cute and warble a kids' tune. (Ricky's father wrote his songs!) Segall appeared in ten of the first twelve episodes in the 1973-74 season before vanishing from the show without any explanation. Only in his first episode did his character have a meaningful role. (New to the neighborhood, Ricky's mom did not like showbiz folks.) The Partridge Family was cancelled after the 1973-74 season with 96 total episodes made. Segall had a spotty TV and movie career after his stint on The Partridge Family. Today he is a married ordained minister with three children. At last report Segall was living and preaching in Canada.

     

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  • Harlem Globetrotters

    1970's Heyday Roster Of The Harlem Globetrotters - * 36: Meadowlark Lemon (1955-80; 1994) * 22: Curly Neal (1963-95) * 12: Twiggy Sanders (1974-91) * 20: Marques Haynes (1972-79) * 35: "Geese" Ausbie (1961-85) * 18: Jimmy Blacklock * 14: Bobby Joe Mason (1962-76) * 41: "Sweet Lou" Dunbar (1975-05) * 39: Frank Stephens * 38: Bobby Hunter * 32: Nate Branch * 34: Theodis Lee * 15: Tyler Anderson Additional players who played with the team during the 1970s included Dallas Thornton, Robert Paige, Tex Harrison, Mel Davis, Ovie Dotson, Doug Himes, Bill Meggett, Sterling Forbes, Lionel Garrett, Sam Drummer, Lee Holman, Clarence Smith, Reggie Franklin and Larry "Gator" Rivers. (I like these clowns) - The Harlem Globetrotters are an exhibition basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy.

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